Learn Sportfishing From The Pros

The IGFA School of Sportfishing is back this fall with 8 information packed classes. The school will held at the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Florida two Tuesdays a month from September through December 2013. Each class is limited to 24 anglers and will be taught by some of the IGFA’s top Captains. Cost per class is $100 USD for IGFA members and $150 USD for non IGFA members but you can receive discounts of up to $25 per class if you register by August 20, 2013. The fee covers the cost of the class, course materials, and tackle used during class. Anglers will also receive complementary tackle and products for attending along with being entered to win various door prizes and an end-of-session raffle for a grand prize.

Here is the course schedule.

Fundamentals of Sportfishing

September 10th by Capt. Tony DiGiulian 

Captain Tony will teach you the must have skills every sportfisherman should know.  The class will cover different types of bait rigging, how to tie critical knots for double line, line to line, terminal connections, and wire twists, and also proper terminal tackle prep like crimping, making leaders and hook sharpening.

 

Trophy Snook and Tarpon Fishing

September 24th by Capt. Shawn Fairbanks

Captain Shawn will teach you how to successfully target and catch monster snook to 30 lbs and tarpon to 200lbs.

 

All About Live Bait

October 8th by Capt. Shawn Fairbanks

Captain Shawn is back to teach you how and where to catch several different species of live bait and how to keep them healthy.

 

Daytime Swordfishing

October 22nd by Capt. RJ Boyle

Captain RJ will teach you the techniques and skills to catch swordfish during the day.  All techniques covered will comply with IGFA rules so that potential records can be certified.

 

Bottom Fishing Wrecks and Reefs

November 5th by Capt. Bouncer Smith

Captain Bouncer will teach you techniques for catching snapper and grouper and other bottom fish.

 

Targeting Nearshore Gamefish: Dolphin, Kings, & Blackfins

November 19th by Capt. Mike Theis

Captain Mike will teach you the most effective strategies for dolphin, kingfish, blackfin tuna, cobia, and more.

 

Wintertime Wahoo

December 3rd by Capt. Tony DiGiulian

Captain Tony is back to teach anglers how to target and more consistently catch wahoo in the cooler months of the year.

 

Kite Fishing Techniques

December 10th by Capt. Bouncer Smith

Captain Bouncer is back to teach you the basics and more advanced techniques of kite fishing, target several different species and enticing fish to bite.

For more details call Anthony Vedral at 954-924-4254 or e-mail avedral@igfa.org.

 

IGFA | IGFA School of Sportfishing

Learn Sportfishing From The Pros

The IGFA School of Sportfishing is back this fall with 8 information packed classes. The school will held at the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Florida two Tuesdays a month from September through December 2013. Each class is limited to 24 anglers and will be taught by some of the IGFA’s top Captains. Cost per class is $100 USD for IGFA members and $150 USD for non IGFA members but you can receive discounts of up to $25 per class if you register by August 20, 2013. The fee covers the cost of the class, course materials, and tackle used during class. Anglers will also receive complementary tackle and products for attending along with being entered to win various door prizes and an end-of-session raffle for a grand prize.

Here is the course schedule.

Fundamentals of Sportfishing
September 10th by Capt. Tony DiGiulian
Captain Tony will teach you the must have skills every sportfisherman should know. The class will cover different types of bait rigging, how to tie critical knots for double line, line to line, terminal connections, and wire twists, and also proper terminal tackle prep like crimping, making leaders and hook sharpening.

Trophy Snook and Tarpon Fishing
September 24th by Capt. Shawn Fairbanks
Captain Shawn will teach you how to successfully target and catch monster snook to 30 lbs and tarpon to 200lbs.

All About Live Bait
October 8th by Capt. Shawn Fairbanks
Captain Shawn is back to teach you how and where to catch several different species of live bait and how to keep them healthy.

Daytime Swordfishing
October 22nd by Capt. RJ Boyle
Captain RJ will teach you the techniques and skills to catch swordfish during the day. All techniques covered will comply with IGFA rules so that potential records can be certified.

Bottom Fishing Wrecks and Reefs
November 5th by Capt. Bouncer Smith
Captain Bouncer will teach you techniques for catching snapper and grouper and other bottom fish.

Targeting Nearshore Gamefish: Dolphin, Kings, & Blackfins
November 19th by Capt. Mike Theis
Captain Mike will teach you the most effective strategies for dolphin, kingfish, blackfin tuna, cobia, and more.

Wintertime Wahoo
December 3rd by Capt. Tony DiGiulian
Captain Tony is back to teach anglers how to target and more consistently catch wahoo in the cooler months of the year.

Kite Fishing Techniques
December 10th by Capt. Bouncer Smith
Captain Bouncer is back to teach you the basics and more advanced techniques of kite fishing, target several different species and enticing fish to bite.

For more details call Anthony Vedral at 954-924-4254 or e-mail avedral@igfa.org.

IGFA | IGFA School of Sportfishing

Florida Kids Fishing Clinics 2013

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will be sponsoring Kids’ Fishing Clinics throughout Florid once again in 2013. These one-day educational events designed to teach children about the vulnerability of Florida’s marine ecosystems and help them become responsible marine resource stewards.

The children go through five mandatory skill stations: Casting, Knot Tying, Fishing Tackle, Good Angler and Touch Tank, that are designed to give each child fundamental saltwater fishing skills and to provide them with a positive fishing experience. The clinic lasts about one hour and each child will receive a free rod and reel for participating. Most clinics will also give the children an opportunity to test there new fishing skills.

Here are the dates and places for Florida’s 2013 Kids Fishing Clinics.

February 23rd
Crystal River
Fort Island Gulf Beach Fishing Pier
12073 W. Fort Island Trail Map
9:00 AM – Noon
Preregistration required: 352-527-7547

March 9th
Fernandina
Ft. Clinch State Park
2601 Atlantic Ave. Map
9 AM – Noon

March 23rd
Daytona Beach
Sunglow Fishing Pier
3701 S. Atlantic Ave. Map
9 AM – Noon

April 6th
Panacea
Wooley Park Map
Mound St.
9 AM – Noon

April 13th
Pensacola
Plaza De Luna
997 S. Palafox St. Map
9 AM – Noon

April 20th
Naples
Naples City Fishing Pier
25 12th Ave. S. Map
9 AM – Noon

June 29th
Cape Canaveral
Cruise Terminal #3
220 Christopher Columbus Dr. Map
9 AM – Noon

How To Harvest Florida Stone Crabs

Stone crab claws are one of the tastiest delicacies to come out of Florida’s waters. Florida’s stone crab season is open to both commercial and recreational fisherman from October 15th to May 15th each year. This video from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission shows you how to properly measure and harvest stone crab claws.

First, measure the claw from the elbow to the tip of the lower claw. This measurement must be at least 23/4″ in length. To remove the claw hold the body and opposite claw of the stone crab firmly in one hand, then grasp the claw you want to remove with you other hand and quickly twist down and pull. The claw should break off where it meets the body. This does not harm the crab and the claw will grow back. To learn more about how to harvest stone crab claws and to check current regulations visit http://myfwc.com/fishing/saltwater/recreational/stone-crabs/

Reel Work Sport Fishing Charters
301 Seabreeze Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
954-522-9399
1-877-524-9377
Email: lauderdalefishing@gmail.com
Website: lauderdalefishing.com
Charter Fishing in Fort Lauderdale

Top Water Amberjack

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Amberjack
Catch Ft. Lauderdale Amberjack

 

I came across an article today about how to catch amberjack on spinning tackle by Alan Peirce of the FWC. Alan says he has only tried this technique in the Florida Panhandle, but I can tell you from experience that it works just as well in the Atlantic off Fort Lauderdale.

Greater amberjack are an offshore species found near reefs, debris, and wrecks. They are the largest of the jacks. The state record was 142 lb and was caught near Islamorada. They are one of the strongest, hardest fighting fish in the sea. There is no closed season for amberjack on the Atlantic side of the state. The minimum size limit is 28 inches fork length. AJ’s are usually found in schools so if you catch one you can usually catch several more.

Alan’s technique starts by locating a school of AJ’s around a reef, wreck or drop off in 65+ feet of water. Once you locate fish drop frisky pinfish, grunts or blue runners halfway to the bottom on a grouper rod spooled with 60 – 8- lb test line. AJ’s are considered a reef fish so you must use non stainless steel circle hooks when using live bait.

Once you have gotten the AJ’s into a feeding mood with the live bait break out some heavy duty spinning or bait-casting rods spooled with 17 – 30 lb test line. These rods should be rigged with 40 – 50-pound mono leader and the biggest, brightest top-water chugger plug you can find. You should replace the treble hooks on these plugs with single hooks and bend the barbs down to make releasing the fish easier on you and the fish.

Cast the plug out and drag it back quickly making sure it makes a lot of commotion. Hold on tight because the AJ’s will explode on the plug. They are not as fast as a wahoo or king mackerel but they are one of the hardest fighting fish and have been known to break both tackle and fishermen.

How To Catch and Release Fish

Florida is known as “The Fishing Capital Of The World”, and for good reason. In 2009, over a million people bought a saltwater recreational fishing license in Florida, 646,000 Florida residents and 384,000 non-residents. Those anglers take an estimated 11 million fishing trips a year. Thats a lot of fishing pressure on the states fish population. Florida’s fishery managers have implemented a slew of regulations to control harvest of the states fish populations, but it is up to the anglers of the state to ensure there are plenty of fish left in the oceans for future generations. One of the best ways to do this is to practice catch and release.

There are many things that will kill a fish that has been hooked and brought to the boat, but the biggest killer is stress. The struggle to escape your hook can exhaust the fish causing an accumulation of excessive amounts of lactic acid in their muscles and blood and leading to death. The best way to prevent this from happening is to use fishing tackle that is large enough to allow you to quickly land your catch. “Fighting” your catch sounds like fun, but causes unnecessary stress on the fish. Hook wounds can also cause fatal damage to fish. If the fish swallows your hook or is hooked in a way that will make it hard to remove the hook, it is best to just cut the line. It is also a good idea to use steel or bronze hooks. Steel and bronze hooks dissolve in a few days and have no lasting effect on the fish.Stainless steel, cadmium- or nickel-plated hooks take much longer to dissolve causing more damage to the fish.

Here are some other tips from the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.

Decide beforehand which fish are to be kept and immediately release all others.

Avoid the use of gaffs and never remove large fish such as tarpon from the water.

If the hook is difficult to remove by hand, use long-nosed pliers or a hook-removal tool.

Try fishing with barbless hooks or crimp and remove the barb.

Wet your hands or gloves before handling the fish.

If your fish is in good shape, put it back into the water headfirst.

Large pelagic species such as sharks and tarpon should be brought alongside the boat within 20 minutes of being hooked.

 

Reel Work Sport Fishing
301 Seabreeze Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
954-522-9399
1-877-524-9377
Email: lauderdalefishing@gmail.com
Website: lauderdalefishing.com
Ft Lauderdale Fishing Charters